Hair Care Tips: How to Care for Your Colored Hair

Hair coloring, also called hair dying, is the act of changing your hair color to another color of your choice. For millennia, men and women changed their hair color to enhance their attractiveness, express their identity, or to make a bold fashion statement.

While hair coloring is a fun and popular cosmetic procedure for enhancing or changing your looks, the harsh chemicals in common hair dyes can damage your hair, leading to dry, brittle, and breakage-prone hair. In this comprehensive hair care guide from Captain Eco, we will provide convenient and effective hair care tips so you can enjoy a head full of healthy, luscious, and vibrant colored hair.

Before we delve into hair care tips for colored hair, let us first learn about the anatomy and structure of a hair fiber.

Hair Structure and Anatomy

Your hair is made in the dermis, deep below the surface of your skin. In the dermis, your hair bulb, which is located at the base of your hair follicle, produces living cells that continuously divide and grow to produce a hair fiber. Your hair fiber is primarily made up of tough structural protein cells called Keratin. Each hair fiber is composed of three layers: the medulla, the cortex, and the cuticle.

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The three layers of a hair fiber each perform distinct functions. The medulla is the innermost soft core of the hair shaft, functioning like a marrow for the hair fiber. The cortex is the main layer of the hair fiber, making up the majority of the hair shaft. The outermost layer of your hair fiber is the hair cuticles, which look like shingles on a roof. Your hair cuticles act like a protective sheath, providing a defensive barrier between the core of your hair and its external environment.

Your hair’s natural color pigments are stored in the core of your hair fiber, giving your hair its distinct hue.

Natural Hair Color

Your hair’s color-making cells, the melanocytes, produce the pigments that give your hair its natural color. Your hair’s natural pigment is stored in the core of your hair shaft, inside the hair fiber’s cortex. These natural pigments are called melanin.

The melanocytes produce two different kinds of melanin: eumelanin, which is a dark pigment, and pheomelanin, which is a light pigment. The blend of these two different types of melanin produces a variety of hair colors. Your hair’s natural color is determined by genetics. Aging, hormones, and environmental factors can also influence the color of your hair.

As you age, the melanocytes of your hair are subjected to repeated damage, becoming dysfunctional over time. Once melanocytes become dysfunctional, they can no longer produce the pigments that give your hair its distinct color. Consequently, your hair turns gray due to a lack of pigments.

With no efficient mechanism to reverse hair graying, most people resort to artificial hair coloring to dye and cover up their gray hair to look younger, and enhance their looks.

History of Hair Coloring

Hair coloring is one of the oldest acts of human adornment and aesthetic enhancement in our history. Changing your hair color is not a modern-day phenomenon. People have been changing their hair color for millennia.

Ancient Greek historian Diodorus Siculus’s description of the Celtic people’s appearance is one of the earliest recorded observations of artificial hair color alterations in our history. In describing the physical appearance of the Celts, Diodorus notes how the Celts washed their hair with limewater to lighten their hair to a pale blonde to distinguish themselves from other groups of people.

In ancient times, people used plant-based dyes and lime water to artificially color or lighten their hair. Today, synthetic and chemical-based hair dyes have replaced plant-based hair dyes as the most popular option for people seeking to alter their hair color.

Synthetic and chemical-based hair dyes are a relatively new invention in human history. The first synthetic hair dye was developed by French chemist Eugene Schueller, the founder of L’Oréal, in 1909. German cosmetics giant Schwarzkopf developed the first at-home hair color line in 1947.

Although hair coloring was affordable and accessible to the masses by the 1950s, only 7% of American women dyed their hair. The cosmetic procedure was considered indecent for the average woman, and was only reserved for Hollywood actresses.

But society’s perception of hair coloring gradually changed. By the l960s, 70% of American women and two million American men artificially changed their hair color. Today, hair coloring is a fun and very popular cosmetic procedure both men and women use to change or improve their appearance.

Hair Coloring Today

Today, the hair coloring industry is a multinational and multi-billion dollar industry. Almost 70% of hair dyes people use are synthetic and chemical-based hair dyes. Chemical-based hair dyes are the most popular hair coloring option as they are longer-lasting, affordable, relatively easy to use, and versatile, allowing you to achieve any hair color imaginable.

Artificially altering your hair color has become a ritual for many people, especially women. It is estimated that up to 80% of women in the United States, European Union, and Japan use hair dye or have used hair dye sometime in their life to change their hair color.

What are Hair Dyes?

Hair dyes are hair coloring agents that change the color of your hair. They contain color particles that either penetrate your hair shaft and bond to your hair’s cortex, or they deposit color particles onto the surface of your hair shaft. This results in temporary or permanent hair color change. Hair dyes can be plant or chemical-based, with chemical-based hair dyes being the most popular option for coloring your hair.

Chemical Hair Dyes

Chemical-based hair dyes use a two-step process to permanently change your hair color. They contain an alkaline agent and an oxidizing agent that work together simultaneously to decolorize your hair’s existing color, and deposit new color particles inside your hair shaft. The alkaline agent, traditionally ammonia, alters the natural acidic pH of your hair shaft, creating an alkaline environment that forces your hair cuticles to open up.

Once the cuticles are forced open, the color particles from your hair dye penetrate inside your hair shaft and bond to your hair’s cortex. The oxidizing agent, traditionally hydrogen peroxide, oxidizes the melanin in your hair’s cortex, decolorizing your hair’s natural pigment. Once your hair’s natural pigment has been decolorized, the new hair color particles deposited in your hair will manifest themselves more noticeably, becoming your new hair color.

Natural Plant-Based Hair Dyes

Plant-based hair dyes, on the other hand, color your hair by depositing color particles onto the surface of your hair shaft. Plant-based hair dyes, such as henna, contain large color particles that cannot penetrate into your hair shaft. Instead, these large color particles adhere and bond to the surface of your hair fiber, resulting in hair color change. Plant-based hair dyes provide a temporary color change, as the color particles deposited onto the surface of your hair shaft will fade gradually with every hair wash.

Depending on the type of hair dye you use, your new hair color will be permanent or last for a few washes.

Types of Hair Dyes

There are different types of hair dyes on the market, with each type produced to satisfy different customer needs. Different types of hair dyes differ in their longevity and coloring mechanism, producing temporary or permanent hair colors that can be subtle or dramatic. There are four common types of hair dyes on the market. Here are the most common types of hair dyes available:

Permanent Hair Dye

Permanent hair dyes use a two-step process to color your hair. Permanent hair dyes contain ammonia, hydrogen peroxide, and tiny color particles which all work together simultaneously to permanently change your hair color.

The ammonia in permanent hair dyes is an alkalizing agent that causes your hair cuticles to open up. This allows the chemicals in your permanent hair dye can react with the pigment molecules inside your hair fiber to permanently change your hair color.

Your hair has a slightly acidic pH, which closes your hair’s cuticles, providing a protective sheath to reinforce the core of your hair fiber. The alkaline pH of the ammonia in your permanent hair dye alters the pH level of your hair from an acidic pH to an alkaline pH. The alkaline pH forces the cuticles on your hair shaft to open, enabling the tiny color particles to penetrate and bond to the core of your hair fiber.

Once your hair’s cuticles are opened, the hydrogen peroxide in your permanent hair dye also penetrates into your hair shaft. Hydrogen peroxide is an oxidizing agent that decolorizes the pigment inside your hair. Once the pigment inside your hair is decolorized and new color particles from your hair dye are deposited inside your hair fiber, your hair takes on a new permanent color.

Hair Bleach

While not technically a hair dye, hair bleaching also permanently changes your hair color using a different coloring mechanism. Hair bleaching does not add any color particles to your hair. Instead, hair bleaching uses ammonia and high concentration hydrogen peroxide to open up your hair cuticles and decolorize the pigment inside your hair fiber.

Once the pigment inside your hair fiber is decolorized, your hair loses its color and becomes colorless, taking on a yellowish hue. The dreaded yellow hair color you get after bleaching your hair is the color of your hair’s keratin, which is your hair’s structural protein. Your hair takes on the color of its structural protein after your hair’s pigment has been completely decolorized.

Permanent hair dyes and hair bleach are the most potent hair coloring options available for changing your hair color. They can be used to permanently lighten, darken, and cover up your gray hair. The results are long-lasting, dramatic, and versatile, enabling you to achieve any hair color you dream of.

While the results of permanent hair dyes and hair bleach are long-lasting, the harsh chemicals used to permanently change your hair color can compromise the integrity of your hair, leading to damaged and breakage-prone hair.

Demi-Permanent Hair Dye

Demi-permanent hair dyes use milder alkaline agents and a lower strength oxidizing agent to color your hair. Demi-permanent hair dyes contain ammonia substitutes such as sodium carbonate and ethanolamine, which are gentler and milder than ammonia.

Further, the hydrogen peroxide used along with demi-permanent hair dyes is usually lower in strength compared to permanent hair dyes, which results in a more subtle color lift. As a result, you cannot use a demi-permanent hair dye to dramatically lighten your hair.

Demi-permanent hair dyes use less harsh chemicals to change your hair color. Therefore, the coloring process is not as potent, effective, and long-lasting as permanent hair dyes. This type of hair dye can only be used for subtly changing your hair color, darken your hair, and cover up gray hair.

Demi-permanent hair dyes are less harsh and damaging on your hair, but they don’t last as long as permanent hair dyes. Your demi-permanent hair dye will last between 20 to 28 shampoos.

Semi-Permanent Hair Dye

Semi-permanent hair dyes use small color particles and low strength hydrogen peroxide to color your hair. This type of hair dye does not contain ammonia or any other alkaline substance. With no alkaline agent to open up your hair cuticles, the color particles in semi-permanent hair dyes cannot fully penetrate into your hair shaft. As a result, semi-permanent hair dyes are less effective than permanent and demi-permanent hair dyes.

While being less effective than permanent and demi-permanent hair dyes, semi-permanent hair dyes are less harsh and damaging on your hair. They are a good option for people seeking to darken their hair color or enhance their natural hair color. Due to its milder composition, semi-permanent hair dyes do not last as long as permanent and demi-permanent hair dyes. Semi-permanent hair dyes last up to eight shampoos.

Temporary Hair Dye

Temporary hair dyes use color particles of a large molecular weight to color your hair. These wash out hair dyes do not contain any alkaline or oxidizing agent. As a result, the color particles in temporary hair dyes cannot penetrate into your hair shaft. Instead, these large color particles deposit and adhere to the surface of your hair shaft, imparting a colored tint on your hair.

Temporary hair dyes are available in many forms, including shampoos, conditioners, sprays, gels, and foams. These safe and non-damaging hair dyes are great for people who seek a temporary hair color change without the commitment of a longer-lasting hair dye. Temporary hair dyes offer a temporary color change. They last up to three shampoos.

Hair Care Tips for Your Colored Hair

Hair coloring is a relatively easy and affordable way to change or enhance your appearance. But the harsh chemicals in common hair dyes cause hair damage. The alkaline and oxidizing agents used in hair dyes harm and erode your hair’s cuticles. Your hair’s cuticle is the protective outermost layer of your hair fiber. It provides a protective sheath over the core of your hair, reinforcing your hair fiber’s structure.

To deposit color particles inside your hair fiber, hair dyes forcefully open up your hair cuticles to enable the pigments in your hair dye to penetrate into your hair shaft. This process requires the use of harsh chemicals, which leads to inevitable and irreversible hair cuticle damage.

Damaged hair cuticles are no longer able to efficiently protect the core of your hair fiber. As a result, colored hair is generally fragile, brittle, and more susceptible to hair breakage and split ends.

Colored hair needs special care and treatment to reduce the damaging effects of hair coloring on your precious locks. Use the following easy and affordable hair care tips to improve the health and condition of your colored hair:

Nutrition

Your hair is a reflection of your health and wellbeing. The food you eat has a direct impact on the health and quality of your hair. You must consume a nutritious diet that provides your body with all the critical nutrients it needs to build strong and resilient hair fibers.

Consuming vital hair-building nutrients in sufficient quantities will help your hair follicles build a more durable hair structure. When your hair fibers have a strong foundation, they are better able to withstand the damaging effects of the harsh chemicals in common hair dyes.

Your hair is made up of a structural protein called keratin. You need to consume protein in sufficient quantities so your body can produce high-quality hair fibers.

Your body regards your hair as a non-essential tissue because your hair does not contribute to enhancing your chances of survival. Therefore, when you are experiencing a nutrient deficiency, your body will withhold that nutrient from your hair. Instead, it will allocate that scarce nutrient to essential bodily tissues and organs, like your heart and lungs, to maximize your chances of survival.

When you don’t consume enough protein, your body will withhold the scarce protein from your hair-producing cells and will allocate the protein to vital bodily functions. Faced with insufficient protein, your hair follicles are forced to produce very low-quality, dull, and brittle hair.

To produce high-quality and durable hair fibers, make sure you are eating sufficient protein on a daily basis.

Protein-Rich Foods

The recommended daily intake of protein is 0.36 grams per pound of body weight, or 0.8 grams per kilogram of body weight. Protein-rich foods include meat, poultry, seafood, eggs, and dairy products.

There are also great plant-based complete protein options available for vegetarians and vegans. Soybeans, tofu, tempeh, spirulina, quinoa, and buckwheat are high-quality complete proteins you can consume if you are on a vegetarian or vegan diet. Complete proteins supply your body with all the essential amino acids it needs so it can perform all its functions optimally.

Color Your Hair Less Often

It’s no secret; coloring your hair will damage your hair. Most common hair dyes contain and use harsh chemicals to change your hair color. Common hair dyes use ammonia and hydrogen peroxide to open up your hair’s cuticles, decolorize your hair’s existing pigment, and deposit new color particles from your hair dye inside your hair shaft. This chemical process results in varying degrees of hair cuticle damage.

Your hair cuticles are the outermost protective sheath of your hair fiber. They safeguard the core and integrity of your hair fiber and reinforce your hair fiber’s structure. The health and condition of your hair cuticles determine your hair’s health, shine, and strength. Once your hair cuticles are damaged, the integrity and structure of your hair fiber are compromised. Damaged hair cuticles lead to fragile and brittle hair that is more prone to breakage and split ends.

To minimize damage from hair coloring, try to reduce your hair coloring sessions. The less you apply chemical hair dyes on your hair, the healthier your hair will be. You must strive to minimize your hair color from fading so you can reduce the number of times you dye your hair.

Washing your hair with lukewarm water, shampooing less often, using dry shampoo, and avoiding hard chlorinated shower water can help you stretch out your coloring sessions for as long as possible.

Avoid Hot Showers

Hot showers are soothing, relaxing, and feel great, but they are detrimental to the health of your skin and hair. The sebaceous glands under your skin produce an oily-waxy substance called sebum. Sebum coats your hair, lubricating your hair shaft and preventing moisture loss.

Hot water strips away your hair’s protective coating. Once sebum is stripped from your hair, your hair loses its natural sealing oil. As a result, your hair loses moisture and dries out, leading to dehydrated and brittle hair.

The cuticles of your hair shaft are temperature-sensitive. They open up under heat and close up under cold temperatures. Hot shower water opens up your hair’s cuticles, accelerating moisture loss, and hair color fade.

Your hair color pigments are stored in your hair’s cortex, which is the layer of your hair fiber just beneath your hair cuticles. When hot water opens your hair’s cuticles, the color particles in your hair’s cortex leach out of your hair and wash away. This results in some degree of color fade every time you wash your hair with hot water.

To prevent hair color fade, wash your hair with lukewarm water or the coldest water you can bear. Cold water seals your hair’s cuticles, reducing moisture loss and hair color fade. This technique will minimize hair color fade with every hair wash, extending the life of your hair color.

As a result, you will no longer need to dye your hair as often as you do to maintain your hair color. Reducing the number of times you dye your hair will help you improve the health and condition of your colored hair.

Shampoo Less Often

Shampooing is essential to maintain a clean scalp and hair. Shampoos contain lathering agents that react with water to produce a soapy substance, helping you remove dirt, sweat, oil, odors, and dead skin cells from your scalp and hair.

Greasy and dirty hair looks limp and lifeless. Shampoos remove dirt and excess oil, giving you clean, lively, and voluminous hair. While shampooing is necessary to maintain a healthy scalp and clean hair, shampooing too frequently removes your hair’s protective natural oils, which results in dull, brittle, and breakage-prone hair.

Your skin produces an oily-waxy substance called sebum to protect your skin and hair, and keep them moisturized. Sebum provides a protective barrier over your hair cuticles, shielding your hair fiber from the harsh external environment.

Colored hair is more susceptible to damage from the external elements, as chemicals in hair dyes damage and erode your hair cuticles. Your hair cuticles are your hair fiber’s first line of defense against external elements. The condition of your hair’s cuticles determines the health and strength of your hair. Sebum provides a protective coating over your hair cuticles, minimizing the damage incurred from everyday wear and tear.

To keep your scalp and hair clean, while also preserving your hair’s protective natural oils, reduce your shampooing frequency. Most dermatologists advise against shampooing your hair every day, as shampooing too frequently is detrimental to the health of your scalp and hair.

Shampooing too frequently can also strip away your hair color with every wash, resulting in a quicker color fade. To prolong your hair color and keep your hair clean-looking and smelling fresh between washes, use a dry shampoo.

Use Dry Shampoo

Dry shampoos are scented powders that absorb excess oil and neutralize odors from your scalp and hair. They usually come in spray form, and are sprayed onto regions of your scalp and hair that need deodorizing and degreasing. The powder in dry shampoos absorbs excess oil, adds a fresh-smelling scent to your hair, and gives your hair bounce, texture, and volume.

Dry shampooing is an easy and time-efficient method to obtain clean-looking hair every day. All you have to do is spray the dry shampoo on your greasy scalp and hair, massage the powder in, and then brush the powder out. Voila! Now you have clean, fresh-smelling, and big voluminous hair.

Using dry shampoos frequently will reduce your traditional hair washing routine, which will help you save time, preserve your hair’s natural oils, and prolong your hair color. Dry shampoos only absorb excess oil, allowing some of your natural oils to remain to protect your scalp and hair.

Further, as dry shampooing avoids traditional water and lather to clean your hair, your hair color is not stripped away with every dry shampooing procedure. This, in turn, will minimize the frequency of your hair coloring sessions, which will promote healthier hair. Dry shampooing preserves your hair’s color and natural oils, resulting in healthier colored hair.

Use Color-Depositing Hair Products

Hair dyes, even long-lasting permanent ones, fade in varying degrees over time. Frequent washing, hair styling, and daily wear and tear cause the color particles to fade out, forcing you to dye your hair frequently to maintain your vibrant hair color. Every time you dye your hair using chemical hair dyes, you damage your hair’s cuticles, leading to weakened hair. To promote healthier colored hair, you must reduce your hair coloring sessions.

You can use color-depositing hair products to stretch out your hair coloring sessions for as long as possible. Color-depositing hair products, which include shampoos, conditioners, and hair masks, deposit color particles on your hair shaft to reinvigorate and prolong your vibrant hair color. These products use color particles of a large molecular weight that adhere and deposit onto the surface of your hair fiber, enriching your current hair color.

Color-depositing hair products do not use chemicals or other harsh substances to add color to your hair. They are an affordable and time-efficient way to maintain your vibrant hair color for as long as possible without any damage done to your hair. Color-depositing hair products can help you extend the life of your hair color and reduce the number of times you dye your hair, saving you money, and promoting healthier colored hair.

Heat-Free Hair Styling

Colored hair sustains chemical damage to its cuticles during the coloring process. As a result, colored hair is fragile, brittle, and more prone to hair breakage and thinning. Colored hair should be treated with extra care and attention, as harsh treatment of colored hair can result in hair breakage and hair loss. Styling your colored hair using high heat is extremely harsh on your delicate locks, and causes further hair damage.

Hot styling tools sap moisture from your hair, dehydrating your hair, and reducing its elasticity. When your hair fibers lose elasticity, they become less supple and break off easily. Extreme heat from hot styling irons causes heat damage and can fry your colored hair. To minimize heat damage to your hair, reduce heat styling, and opt for heat-free hairstyles instead.

 

Heat-free hairdos offer beautiful and damage-free hairstyles you can do in the comfort of your home. Heat-free hairstyles work best on damp hair, as your hair will dry into whatever shape it was in. Heat-free hairstyles allow you to style your fragile, colored hair without damaging it or compromising its integrity.

If you want to enhance the health of your colored hair, replace most of your heat styling sessions with heat-free hair styling. If you must use heat styling, make sure you are wearing a heat-protectant on your hair to minimize heat damage on your delicate colored locks.

Install a Shower Filter

Your regular unfiltered shower water contains chemicals, minerals, heavy metals, and other impurities that can damage your fragile, colored locks. Common minerals in your shower water, such as calcium and magnesium, make your shower water hard and alkaline, which is detrimental to the health of your hair.

Unfiltered shower water also contains chlorine. Chlorine is a bleaching agent that is commonly used as a disinfectant to kill harmful microbes. Chlorine is widely used in the public water system for disinfecting the water to make it safe for human consumption. The chlorine in your shower water will strip away your scalp and hair’s natural oils, resulting in dry, brittle, and breakage-prone hair.

The Natural pH of Your Hair

Your scalp and hair have a naturally acidic pH. The acidic pH promotes healthy hair as it keeps your hair cuticles closed to prevent moisture loss and protect your hair structure’s integrity.

An alkaline pH forces your hair cuticles open, promoting moisture loss, and exposing your hair’s core to the harsh external elements. Colored hair is brittle and fragile, and is, therefore, more prone to damage by coming into contact with an alkaline substance, such as hard water.

To protect your colored hair from hard and chlorinated water, install a shower filter in your bathroom. Shower filters are water filtration tools that soften hard water, balance water’s pH, and considerably reduce the amount of chlorine in your shower water, producing cleaner, purer, and healthier shower water.

A shower filter is an efficient and affordable investment in the health of your colored hair.

 

Apply Leave-In Conditioner

Common hair dyes use harsh chemicals to effectively change your hair color. Chemicals such as ammonia and hydrogen peroxide in your hair dye forcibly open up your hair cuticles to enable the colorants in your hair dye to penetrate and deposit inside your hair shaft.

This chemical process results in some degree of hair cuticle damage. Your hair cuticles are the outermost protective sheath of your hair fiber. They protect and shield the core of your hair fiber against harmful external elements.

Coloring your hair using chemical hair dyes inflicts irreversible damage on your hair cuticles. Damaged hair cuticles can no longer efficiently protect the core and integrity of your hair fiber. As a result, your hair fiber weakens and becomes brittle, breaking off easily, leading to thinning hair. To reinforce and strengthen your hair fibers, you must apply another protective coating over your hair shaft to help bolster your hair cuticle’s function in protecting your hair.

 

To reinforce your hair fiber and bolster the function of your hair cuticles, use a leave-in conditioner to add an extra layer of protective coating over your hair. Leave-in conditioners are conditioning agents that you apply on your hair and let it remain in your hair until your next hair wash. The conditioning agents deposited on your hair provide an extra layer of coating over your hair shaft, protecting and strengthening your hair fiber.

The extra layer of protection provided by your leave-in conditioner minimizes moisture loss, increases your hair’s elasticity, and shields your hair cuticles against damage. Use a leave-in conditioner after every hair wash to add an extra protective layer over your colored hair.

Use Deep Conditioning and Reconstructing Hair Treatments

Colored hair needs extra attention and care, as hair coloring irreversibly damages your hair’s cuticles. Damaged hair cuticles have plenty of cracks and holes on their surface. The cracks and holes on the surface of your hair shaft accelerate moisture loss and weaken the integrity of your hair fiber, resulting in fragile hair that is more prone to breakage.

To reverse some of the damage incurred on your hair, use a weekly deep conditioning treatment to improve the health of your colored hair.

 

Deep conditioners, also known as hair masks, are more concentrated versions of your regular hair conditioners. They contain higher concentrations of nourishing ingredients and bonding agents that help to temporarily reverse some of the damage your hair had endured. The nourishing ingredients in your hair mask deeply moisturize your hair, restoring your hair’s moisture to optimal levels.

Hair Reconstructors

Many hair masks also contain bonding agents such as proteins and amino acids that adhere to the surface of your hair shaft, temporarily reconstructing your damaged hair. These hair treatment products are traditionally called hair reconstructors.

Hair reconstructors contain proteins and amino acids that bind to the surface of your hair shaft. These bonding ingredients form a protective and sturdy coating over the surface of your hair shaft, filling in cracks and holes on your hair fiber. This results in a stronger and more resilient hair fiber that is more durable and less prone to breakage.

To increase the efficiency of your hair masks and reconstructors, apply mild heat on your hair treatment to help the nourishing ingredients penetrate deep into your hair fiber. This technique helps your hair treatment repair and reconstruct your hair from the inside out. Use hair moisturizing and reconstructing treatments frequently to keep your colored hair in tiptop condition.

Image courtesy of Freepik

Hair coloring is one of the oldest cosmetic procedures in our history. For thousands of years, men and women changed their hair color to look more attractive or to define their own unique identity. Hair coloring is a fun, easy, and relatively affordable way to quickly change the way you look.

But hair coloring also has its downsides. The chemicals used in hair dyes to change your hair color damage your precious locks, resulting in dull and lifeless hair. While you can’t completely avoid damage from your hair coloring sessions, you can take steps to minimize the damage. The tips described above can help you minimize damage from hair dyes, and improve the health and condition of your colored hair.

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